Categories
Poems

Not Your Spice Girl

Much of South Asian literature is themed around food – milk and honey, saffron and cinnamon, jalebis and gulab jamuns, turmeric and mangos. Our food is electric in hues, decadent, an explosion of flavour, medicinal in nature.

I get why food takes centre stage in South Asian literature; alot of our parents expressed their love through food. While South Asian cooking is a part of my identity – after all, our ancestral land was colonized in some part for those commodities – it’s not a significant part of my story as a person.

Categories
Poems

Ode to London

When he told her he was coming to the city but not to see her, she was angry

Not because she’d miss the way he would have smiled when he spotted her from a mile away

Categories
Thinkpieces

It’s a London Thing

shoreditch

I wrote something recently about the London Bridge terror attacks for MuslimGirl.com, which you can read now.

I won’t expand on it here, but please do have a read and let me know your thoughts on it. And in light of it, I’d like to share some of my favourite quotes on my hometown – and in my opinion, the greatest city on earth. Go ahead, @ me bruh.

Categories
Food

The Bird IS The Word

Peter BIRD

As much as we love a good burger, how many more new adaptations can we endure? The honest burger, the dirty burger, the Mexican burger, the Tinseltown yaas-there’s-a-halal-option burger… frankly I’m done with £9 burgers for a while and thankfully my spirit food, chicken, is becoming available in the form of speciality dishes we hadn’t got to experience in this country very often pre-Nandos popularity, where it all boomed for us.

Enter BIRD Restaurant. I’d heard about it via friends and some celebrity faces on Twitter and after a peek at the menu, I made my way there sharpish.

Categories
Food

I Found Love In Boom Burger

photo (3)

Well, here’s another food rant. I’ve spoken about food here twice before, with no rave reviews as yet. But third time’s a charm, and yesterday I indulged in some amazing Jamaican-style food on Portobello Road, London.

‘A Little Taste Of Jamaica, That’s Making The Heart Of London Go Boom!’

Categories
News Work

I Went To See Kevin Hart & Friends, And…

KH

On October 12 I ventured down to the SEE Arena in Wembley – it was the first time I had been to the Wembley Arena, and I understood why on my journey – it’s MILES AWAY from where I live, near Croydon. But I thought Kevin Hart‘s HartBeat Weekend was worth trekking down to Wembley for – on a Sunday, in the rain…

rain

Categories
Interviews Music

The Time I Met Lauryn Hill

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I went to the Brooklyn Bowl at the O2 in London on Sunday (September 28) to see the one and only Lauryn Hill perform – obviously, I had heard people moaning about how it was sub par – the sound wasn’t right, she performed her songs in a weird manner – i.e not the way we hear it on the album – which made them unrecognizable… she was also late. However, I walked into the venue with none of that in mind – can I also just say that the venue is pretty awesome; I will definitely be getting my wave on and bowling there in the near future (picture me rollin’). 

Categories
Music Work

Review – Watch The Throne (London)

This weekend, the UK finally got to witness the most highly anticipated tour of the year – ‘Watch The Throne’. The concepts for the show were clear; minimalism, sharp visuals and pure quality were key on what Jay-Z called this “glorious occasion.” Kicking off their minimalistic approach, the show did not feature any supporting acts. We saw the pair grace the stage clad in “all black everything” at 8.30pm, starting off with ‘H.A.M’.

The rappers started off standing on two different platforms a fair distance opposite each other, which then elevated them above the audience. They went on to perform ‘Who Gon’ Stop Me’ and ‘Otis’ together on the main stage, which displayed a huge American flag.

Visuals throughout the show absolutely reeked of Kanye. As the friends performed ‘Welcome to the Jungle’, we saw wild animals attacking their prey on the big screen, an obvious reference to the one thing that was made clear at this occasion – they are the Kings of the rap jungle.

The show was primarily a showcase of the ‘Watch The Throne’ LP, however it could have also been classed as a Greatest Hits tour, as the Jay-Z and Kanye both performed their own sets.

Rap peers should bring pen and paper when viewing the show as many of them could learn something from the Roc Nation businessmen; the rappers both managed to project their characters and charisma to the audience in an overwhelming manner.

Jigga kicked the solo sessions off with ‘Where I’m From’ and ‘Jigga What, Jigga Who’. A professional performer, the 42-year-old put on a polished, controlled performance, with his reserved energy giving him the superiority of a big brother to ‘Ye.

On the other hand, Kanye was snarling, screeching and rapping on his knees at points of the show, giving us a raw performance that you could feel across the dome. Although they both had a strong solo playlist, Kanye prevailed in his showcase of his contribution to pop culture as he performed tracks such as ‘Can’t Tell Me Nothing’, ‘Flashing Lights’ and ‘All Falls Down’.

The Chi-town rapper also revealed his inner-diva during his performance, cutting a track off and reloading it as he wasn’t happy with the camera man’s angles, correcting him before telling him “I know what I’m doing. Sorry London, I want you to have the best show.”

Catering across the board, Jay-Z made the rap fiends happy as he performed hip-hop classics such as ‘I Just Wanna Love You’ ‘Big Pimpin’’ ’99 Problems’ ‘On To The Next One’ and more. Kanye made the ladies smile with a quick set from his ‘808’s and Heartbreak’ album, which saw him perform ‘Heartless’ and ‘Runaway’. It ended with the 34-year-old looking pretty emotional as he sang “If I told you I don’t like the way your hair looks tonight, don’t listen to me baby, cause I’m an asshole…”

A powerful moment came when Louis Armstrong’s ‘What A Wonderful World’ blared through the speakers as images of riots, the KKK and general destruction were displayed. The rappers kept their backs to us, watching the images themselves and letting us soak up the unspoken statement on the irony of America’s patriotism as ‘No Church In The Wild’ began.

Of course, the encore couldn’t have been anything else but ‘N****s In Paris’.  The pair reloaded the track 5 times, although the audience probably would have been happy to hear it 10 times.

The pair graced the stage for over two hours and I was pleased to see that they seemed to have put their blood, sweat and tears into it; there was a preconception that because of how high-profile they are, this might not be the case.

Overall, Jay and ‘Ye gave us a phenomenal exhibition showing us why they have dominated the music scene over the past 10 years, performing more hits than I can name. They successfully gave us a clear insight into their world, letting us feel their potent power and their strong connection to not only each other, but their audience.

As the concert ended, Yeezy said “If this was your first concert, it is all downhill from here.” For once I would have to agree that this isn’t his ego talking, it’s the truth.